Genealogical Evidence, Is your Ancestor Really Your Ancestor?

I hope that as you continue or start searching for your Mexican Ancestors that you do document every and each person that you add to your family tree. When I started I was just a name collector. That is right a “Name Collector” that is what genealogist call people that their only focus is collecting names. That was several years ago, and my family tree used to have close to 20,000 names.

My information would come from books, internet, and other peoples family trees. I was Ok with this and if you are a name collector that is fine with me but if anyone asks you to prove why you claim an ancestor to be yours how will you prove it.

This happened to me. I was asked about a particular ancestor and could not prove that he was my ancestor. Up until that point I had no citations as to even mention where I had gotten my information from. It was that day that I decided to restart my family tree and not add anyone to my tree without a citation or original document. I started with my self and then worked my way back. Now days I can trace many of my ancestors back to the 1500’s and provide copies of original documents to prove my ancestry.

If at this point you are not citing your sources and or trying to obtain documents I highly recommend that you start doing it. Your research will take new life. You will also find more information about your ancestors than just dates and places.

To help you learn a bit more I recently found a PDF document made from a slide show that Rosalinda M. Ruiz prepared about Genealogical Evidence. She does a great job of explaining it.

Front page of “Genealogical Evidence”:

View or Download PDF Document:

Don’t be scared about citing your information, you will be thankful later when you revisit a particular ancestor and you are able to retrace your steps as to why you decided to add them to your tree.

Here are some resources about citing:

Even is you do not use the above mentioned formats just make sure to include. The name of the author, name of book or website, internet address, and or anything that will help readers or your descendants locate the source where you obtained your information.

Any questions about citing let me know in the comments bellow.

4 thoughts on “Genealogical Evidence, Is your Ancestor Really Your Ancestor?

  1. Nanis Wallace (Guerra Guajardo)

    All I see when I click on the download PDF link for Rosalinda Ruiz’s Genealogical Evidence is a black screen and a green bar at the top. I am very interested in how to format the citations because I only want to do this once. Can you just email a copy of the pdf? Looking forward to meeting you at the conference in Austin, Moises!

    1. Moises Garza Post author

      I think it is no longer available. She is a member of our Mexican Genealogy group on facebook. Try to contact her. On google you can also search MLA and or APA Styles cheat sheets to see how to format citations properly.

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